Replacement Windows

I need to replace some old (20-30 years old) double glazing windows in a rural cottage which is subject to quite strong winds - anyone got any hints on what to go for? Are there are features I should look out for or avoid?

Thanks in advance…

Any of the big window suppliers will claim that their windows are gale proof. Maybe they are, although my Everest ones are not. The weak points are where the windows are fixed to the walls. If you are worried about air leakage then go for Passivhaus windows if you can afford them, fitted by the supplier’s approved team to Passivhaus airtightness standards. Such frames are usually wider than standard British ones which also gives scope for additional fixings to prevent the windows being dislodged by high winds.
While doing the windows consider insulating the reveals too. Where there is least distance to the outside is where the walls will be coolest and the humidity highest.

There was an event a few months back with the green building store about windows. It may be worth watching it back on the carbon coop YouTube (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JhDHtqfUa3s). I got the impression that the detailing on the install was a really important factor. A good window installed poorly may perform like an average window installed well. Poorly installed doesn’t even just mean poor workmanship, but also just not thinking about things like where the window sits in relation to wall insulation, air sealing tapes etc.

The green building store people certainly sounded like they knew what they were doing.

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I would look no further than Green Building Store windows.

I did a lot of research when we were having our house refurbished (to be fair not in a rural cottage) and got quotes from 20+ firms. There was nothing to get close to GBS on the combination of quality and cost. Add to that superb customer service and there is nothing not to like.
I have not regretted the decision to go with GBS for a second.
Alan